What's new

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Now hiring: Strategic foresight specialist for a one-year project coordinator contract

The Institute is seeking a strategic foresight specialist for a project coordinator position. This person will work on a federally funded research project examining the future of work for young people with disabilities. The Canadian labour market is undergoing a substantial shift with the rise of automation and precarious work. What are the implications for young people with disabilities, who already face barriers accessing the labour market? 

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At Work Spring 2019 is out

The Spring 2019 issue of At Work is out! In this issue, read about a study evaluating the implementation and effectiveness of Ontario's mandatory working-at-heights training standard. Learn about the impact of unpaid caregiving responsibilities on women's work. See the trendlines for workplace violence in the two most at-risk sectors, broken down by gender. 

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This Sunday, take a moment to mark Day of Mourning

The National Day of Mourning, held April 28 every year, is a day to remember all those who have lost their lives or suffered health consequences due to work hazards. Many of the Institute's partner organizations in the prevention system are sharing stories or holding events to mark the day.

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Ontario's mandatory working-at-heights training led to safer practices and reduced claims rates

Falls from heights are a significant occupational health and safety hazard. In 2015, Ontarios Ministry of Labour implemented a mandatory training program to better protect construction workers who work at heights. An evaluation study by a team at the Institute for Work & Health has found that the training had high uptake across the province. It also led to a decline in claims rates due to falls targeted by the trainingespecially among very small employers and construction subsectors with the most frequent fall injuries.

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See you at Partners in Prevention 2019

Are you going to Partners in Prevention on April 30-May 1? Come by our booth (Booth #525) to check out the latest IWH research findings and tools, and to pick up your copy of our popular handout, “5 things we think you should know.” While you’re there, get details about the XXII World Congress on Safety and Health at Work, a global forum on emerging challenges and cutting-edge best practices in occupational health and safety. The World Congress 2020, co-hosted by IWH and the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS), is coming to Toronto October 4-7, 2020.

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Arthritis advocacy organization develops resources with IWH research

For the three in five Canadians with arthritis who are of working age, a diagnosis can have considerable impact on work. The Canadian Arthritis Patient Alliance (CAPA), a Canada-wide, patient-driven grassroots organization, recently developed a set of resources for patients on managing the condition at work. To develop the resources, CAPA surveyed its members on employment needs and integrated research, including studies conducted by IWH. The Institute’s Dr Arif Jetha, especially, worked closely with CAPA to provide the evidence behind the messages. 

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News release: women experience more work disruptions due to eldercare

The burden of caring for an older relative falls more on women than on men, and it’s showing up in women's higher rates of work disruption. According to a new Institute for Work & Health study, women are more likely than men to stop working, to work part-time or to take time off work during the week due to eldercare. The open access study is published in the Journals of Gerontology.  

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What supports, and how much, do boomers with chronic diseases need?

Older workers with diabetes or arthritis experience more fatigue and pain. But how different are they from healthy older workers in their need for, and use of, workplace accommodation and supports? An open access IWH study examined this question. It also looked at differences in work outcomes when people have access to supports when they’re needed.

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International expert on work precarity and health inequity speaking in Toronto on April 11

Precarious employment is prevalent in low-income countries where as many as three in four workers are employed in the informal economy. Work precarity is also on the rise in high-income countries, where its effects are felt most by young workers, women, migrants and ethnic minorities. On April 11, Dr. Joan Benach, director of the Health Inequalities Research Group at Pompeu Fabra University in Barcelona, Spain, delivers the John R. Evans Lectureship in Global Health. The lecture, co-hosted by IWH, is free and open to the public.

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Ontario employers: tell us about your experience hiring newcomers

Employers play an important role in both hiring and subsequently providing safe work environments for recent immigrants. Researchers at the Institute for Work & Health want to understand the opportunities and challenges employers experience regarding work integration of newcomers, and their resource needs to help newcomers stay safe at work. We invite you to help by participating in a research study that examines the experiences and expectations of employers in relation to hiring and training recent immigrants and refugees in Ontario.