Newcomers

Immigrant workers account for much of the labour force growth in Canada. IWH research seeks to understand the work experiences of recent immigrants (newcomers) to Canada, the barriers they face in understanding and accessing their occupational health and safety and workers’ compensation rights and responsibilities, and the tools and programs needed to help ensure they can be safe and productive members of the Canadian labour force.

Featured

Two smiling women at the airport
At Work article

Newcomers often lack OHS protection and information in their precarious first jobs

A study by the Institute for Work & Health examines the labour market experiences of newcomers to Canada and identifies a key role for settlement agencies
Published: February 13, 2018
Canadian Occupational Safety logo
IWH in the media

New beginnings: Recent immigrants need more support to reduce their heightened risk of injury

A recent study spanning across the United Kingdom, Australia and Canada found newcomers are at a higher risk of work-related injury and illness. Canadian Occupational Safety editor Amanda Silliker speaks to health and safety professionals and researchers in Canada, including IWH's Dr. Basak Yanar, about ways to reduce risks among recent immigrants.
Published: Canadian Occupational Safety, August 2019
Journal article
Journal article

Occupational health and safety vulnerability of recent immigrants and refugees

Published: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, September 2018
Three mature women look at camera
Research Highlights

OHS vulnerability among new immigrants

Recent immigrant workers are 1.6 times more likely than Canadian-born workers to experience occupational health and safety (OHS) vulnerability, defined as exposure to hazards without adequate protection to mitigate those hazards.
Published: August 2018
London Free Press logo
IWH in the media

Baranyai: Workplace training key for safety of newcomers

A local store manager was eager to help newcomers from Syria find employment, but he made something clear. Before they could work a single shift, they would need sufficient language skills to complete job safety training. This safety-first approach is not a universal experience among recent immigrants, according to a study by the Institute for Work & Health, writes columnist Robin Baranyai.
Published: The London Free Press, April 2018
Journal article
Journal article

The occupational health and safety vulnerability of recent immigrants accessing settlement services

Published: Canadian Journal of Public Health, April 2018
Project report
Project report

Safe employment integration of recent immigrants and refugees

This report details the findings of an Institute for Work & Health study on employment preparation process of newcomers in Ontario, with the aim of determining key training and resource needs and opportunities related to safely integrating recent immigrants and refugees into the labour market.
Published: March 2018
Two smiling women at the airport
At Work article

Newcomers often lack OHS protection and information in their precarious first jobs

They face difficulty finding work, due to language barriers, foreign credentials or lack of Canadian experience. Their first jobs are precarious, sometimes unpaid. To top it off, they receive next to no training on OHS and employment standards issues, as a new IWH study has found.
Published: February 2018
Workers of various ethnicities pose happily with their work team
Impact case study

Concerns about newcomers’ safety at work lead organizations to IWH toolkit

Organizations working with recent immigrants are incorporating parts of the Institute's toolkit for teaching newcomers about workplace health and safety into their programming. Organizations in Ontario, Alberta, Northwest Territories and Nunavut, and even as far away as Australia, say the resource is just what they were looking for.
Published: December 2017
Canadian Occupational Safety logo
IWH in the media

Recent immigrants, refugees largely unaware of OHS: Researchers

When immigrants and refugees come to Canada, they are handed a 140-page document that contains only one small paragraph about employee rights. Unfortunately, this might be the only OHS exposure these workers receive, writes Amanda Silliker, reporting on an Institute for Work & Health research project.
Published: Canadian Occupational Safety, November 2017