Training

IWH research on occupational health and safety (OHS) training focuses on its effectiveness—from the effectiveness of delivery methods and contents to the effectiveness of training programs overall. OHS training, mandated by workplace health and safety laws in jurisdictions across Canada and beyond, is considered an important part of managing workplace hazards and risks. Such training may involve instruction on identifying occupational risks and how to control them, learning about safe workplace practices and how to properly use personal protective equipment.

Featured

A lone roofing worker sits perched on top of a new being built
At Work article

Ontario’s working-at-heights training led to safer practices, reduced injury claims rates

Institute for Work & Health’s multi-part evaluation of province’s mandatory training standard found claims reduction greatest among small employers and high-risk construction subsectors
Published: April 11, 2019
A worker guides a crane lifting concrete at a construction site
At Work article

Embedding essential skills training in OHS lessons can boost learning: study

A pilot project by the Institute for Work & Health finds improved learning when hoisting and rigging students receive essential skills content as part of OHS training
Published: April 26, 2018
A lone roofing worker sits perched on top of a new being built
At Work article

Ontario’s working-at-heights training led to safer practices, reduced injury claims rates

Ontario's mandatory training standard for construction workers at risk of falls from heights was effective in reducing claims rates—especially among small employers and high-risk subsectors—an IWH evaluation study found.
Published: April 2019
Project report
Project report

Evaluation of the implementation and effectiveness of the Ontario working-at-heights training standard: final report

The Institute for Work & Health shares the findings from its evaluation of the implementation and effectiveness of a mandatory working-at-heights training program introduced in Ontario in 2015. Ontario employers were required to ensure that workers on construction projects who worked at heights had successfully completed the training by October 2017.
Published: February 2019
Project report
Project report

Evaluation of the implementation and effectiveness of the Ontario working-at-heights training standard: executive summary

This summary shares the highlights from an Institute for Work & Health evaluation of the implementation and effectiveness of a mandatory working-at-heights training program introduced in Ontario in 2015. Ontario employers were required to ensure that workers on construction projects who worked at heights had successfully completed the training by October 2017.
Published: February 2019
IWH Speaker Series
IWH Speaker Series

Assessing workplace training for skin exposure prevention

For almost 20 years, the Centre for Research Expertise in Occupational Disease has studied skin exposure prevention strategies, including worker training on this common hazard. In this presentation, Dr. Linn Holness shares research findings on training effectiveness, highlighting gaps, barriers and facilitators to training implementation.
Published: December 2018
London Free Press logo
IWH in the media

Baranyai: Workplace training key for safety of newcomers

A local store manager was eager to help newcomers from Syria find employment, but he made something clear. Before they could work a single shift, they would need sufficient language skills to complete job safety training. This safety-first approach is not a universal experience among recent immigrants, according to a study by the Institute for Work & Health, writes columnist Robin Baranyai.
Published: The London Free Press, April 2018
A worker guides a crane lifting concrete at a construction site
At Work article

Embedding essential skills training in OHS lessons can boost learning: study

The work of rigging and hoisting loads comes with significant hazard. Adding to the injury prevention challenge is the fact that many people doing this work have literacy and numeracy skills gaps. A recent IWH study tried out a novel approach to address these learning needs.
Published: April 2018
Graphic of cranes hoisting letters in word learning
Tools and guides

Essential Skills and OHS Training

This guide, based on a research collaboration led by the Institute for Work & Health, provides an overview of the process involved in modifying the curriculum of an existing occupational health and safety (OHS) training program in order to address gaps in essential skills among worker trainees.
Published: April 2018
Equipment Journal logo
IWH in the media

Ontario plans to review Working at Heights training

“Working at heights is one of the most dangerous types of work in the construction sector,” says Dr. Cameron Mustard, president and senior scientist, Institute for Work & Health, in an article on Ontario's plans to review working-at-heights training standards. “By working with stakeholders to evaluate the WAH standards, we will help ensure construction workers are protected on the job and will return home safely at the end of each workday.”
Published: Equipment Journal, December 2017
View of training room from the back
At Work article

IWH study examines effect of Ontario’s mandatory OHS training on awareness

On July 1, 2014, a new occupational health and safety requirement took effect in Ontario. An IWH research team conducted a study on differences in OHS awareness before and after the requirement took effect. Read about the findings.
Published: November 2017