Job strain and the prevalence of uncontrolled hypertension among white-collar workers

Publication type
Journal article
Authors
Lavigne-Robichaud M Trudel X Duchaine CS Milot A Gilbert-Ouimet M Vezina M Talbot D Dalens V Aube K Brisson C
Date published
2019 Jun 01
Journal
Hypertension Research
Pages
[epub ahead of print]
Open Access?
No
Abstract

To determine whether white-collar workers treated for hypertension who are exposed to psychosocial stressors at work have a higher prevalence of uncontrolled hypertension than unexposed workers, this study conducted three waves of data collection over a 5-year period (repeated cross-sectional design). The study sample was composed of 464 white-collar workers treated for hypertension. At each collection time, ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) was measured every 15 min during the workday. Uncontrolled hypertension was defined as a mean daytime systolic ABP >/=135 mmHg and/or diastolic ABP >/=85 mmHg for non-diabetic participants and systolic ABP >/=125 mmHg and/or diastolic ABP >/=75 mmHg for diabetic participants. Job strain was evaluated with Karasek's demand-latitude model using validated scales for psychological demands and decision latitude. Prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using generalized estimating equations, adjusting for sociodemographic and lifestyle-related risk factors. Men with job strain (high demands and low latitude) and active jobs (high demands and high latitude) had a higher prevalence of uncontrolled hypertension (PR job strain = 1.46, 95% CI: 1.07-1.98 and PR active = 1.47, 95% CI: 1.12-1.94). When considered separately, high demands were associated with a higher prevalence of uncontrolled hypertension in both men (PR highest tertile = 1.60, 95% CI: 1.25-2.06) and women (PR highest tertile = 1.60, 95% CI: 1.03-2.47). Workers exposed to psychosocial stressors at work according to the demand-latitude model had a higher prevalence of uncontrolled hypertension. Reducing these frequent exposures could help to reduce the burden of uncontrolled hypertension