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Logo for World Congress COVID-19 and occupational safety and health digital meeting in October 2020
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World Congress 2021 hosting free ‘COVID-19 and OSH’ virtual session in early October

Registraion is now open. On October 5, 2020, a half-day special session on COVID-19 and occupational safety and health (OSH) is being offered by the organizers of the 2021 World Congress on Safety and Health at Work—and IWH is among them as a national co-host of the global event. This free, virtual session will feature thought-leaders discussing innovations in addressing COVID-19 in the workplace, how the future of work is being shaped by the global pandemic, and the relevance of promoting a culture of prevention to address COVID-19. Additional sessions are also being organized for October 6, 2020.

Disability and Work in Canada conference logo
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Call for proposals: Disability and Work in Canada 2020 Virtual Conference

The Disability and Work in Canada 2020 (DWC 2020) Conference will be held virtually this year over four days in late November and early December. Organizers are accepting proposals for different types of sessions from the disability community, businesses, unions, policy-makers, service providers and other interested parties. The call is open until Friday, September 25. 

Construction equipment amid dusk and haze
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Three methods to reduce silica dust in construction: comparing the costs and benefits

Silica dust is responsible for 570 cases of lung cancer in Canada a year; the majority of these are diagnosed in construction workers. Construction workplaces can use different methods to protect workers from exposure to silica dust, but which methods should they opt for? A cost-benefit analysis led by the Institute for Work & Health offers some guidance.

A woman with a bandaged left arm fills out injury claim form
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Exposure to known hazards a factor in injury reporting: Institute study

What factors may be linked to workers reporting or not reporting their work-related injuries to a workers’ compensation board? An Institute for Work & Health (IWH) study, building upon previous research on rates of under-reporting, finds workers are more likely to report their injuries when they are exposed to known hazards or have greater awareness about occupational health and safety.

A blurry image of people at work
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Episodic health conditions challenge workplace disability management systems

Employers are recognizing that they need a new model of disability management to support workers with episodic health conditions, according to a new Institute for Work & Health study. These conditions, which are characterized by periods of good health interrupted by unpredictable periods of illness and disability, can raise a host of issues for workplaces—including issues related to privacy, stigma and trust.

A stack of cardboard moving boxes
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We've moved!

After nearly 20 years at 481 University Avenue, the Institute for Work & Health (IWH) had to move out to make way for a 55-storey condominium. We didn't go far. We’re still in the same Toronto neighbourhood, close to the Dundas Street and University Avenue intersection. As of August 2020, our new address is:

Institute for Work & Health
400 University Avenue, Suite 1800
Toronto, ON M5G 1S5

Our phone and fax numbers remain the same.

A vista of a small town in British Columbia
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Urban-rural differences in work disability days not always as expected

We know from past studies that injured workers in rural areas are likely to be off work longer than injured workers in cities. Now, a study involving IWH scientists takes a closer look at urban-rural differences in work disability across several provinces and industrial sectors. It finds a more nuanced picture, one in which injured workers in the more rural areas are not necessarily the ones with the longest disability durations.

A man kneels as he works with decking boards on a patio
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Review summary explores relationship between work and osteoarthritis

Bending, kneeling, climbing or lifting. Which of these work activities, among others, are associated with a greater risk of osteoarthritis (OA) in men and women? A systematic review conducted by IWH—the first to include a wide range of joints affected by OA—are now summarized in our latest Sharing Best Evidence

Five images from 5 things you should know handout
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5 Things We Think You Should Know

Every year, we pull together five of IWH's most practical research findings from the past year for professionals in occupational health and safety (OHS). The 2020 edition of 5 Things We Think You Should Know is now available. What five key health and safety findings did we choose for you this year?

A grey coronavirus amid question marks
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How IWH research is adapting to reflect COVID-19 context

It will likely take time for researchers, workplace parties and policy-makers to understand the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the intersection between work and health. Here at the Institute, several ongoing studies are being adapted to reflect new pandemic realities.