What’s new

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Watch again: A systematic review of workplace interventions to manage depression

The research literature to date suggests that cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) can help people with depression stay at work—and CBT with a focus on work can help people return to work after a depression-related absence. These findings from a systematic review, on workplace interventions to manage depression, were the focus of an IWH Speaker Series presentation in January 2018. If you missed that presentation or want to watch it again, it's available as a slidecast. 

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Now recruiting Manitoba construction firms for an OHS leading indicators study

How does your construction company measure up on safety? IWH and the Construction Safety Association of Manitoba are teaming up on a project to develop health and safety leading indicators for the construction sector. They’re also building benchmarks for the province’s construction workplaces. The project is now recruiting construction firms operating in Manitoba of all types and sizes to complete an online survey. Watch and share the recruitment video to help us spread the word. Or go to our project page for recruiting info.

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Boost OHS training outcomes with embedded essential skills content

Are you concerned that literacy or numeracy skills gaps among workers would get in the way of their uptake of job skills or OHS training? If so, embedding essential skills content in the job or OHS training could help. Our recent study of hoisting and rigging learners showed better scores among those who took the training with embedded essential skills. A guide based on that research is now available to download.

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Guide to support workers with depression now available to download

If someone you work with or supervise experiences depressionor if you have symptoms yourselfthere are ways to offer and seek support. Our new Evidence-informed guide to supporting people with depression in the workplace lays out tips and suggestions. It’s aimed at helping people with depression cope with symptoms while working or returning to work after an episode of depression. Users may include individuals with depression, managers, co-workers, human resources staff, union representatives and worker representatives. When it comes to supporting workers with depression, everyone can help.

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The Spring 2018 At Work is out

In this issue... what researchers, workers and managers say about how to support employees with depression; the link between facilities near or at work—such as playing fields, gyms and shower rooms—and workers' exercise level; the economic burden of non-melanoma skin cancers due to sun exposure at work, and more. If you're not getting the issue in your inbox, make sure to subscribe!

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On Saturday, April 28, mark National Day of Mourning

This Saturday, April 28, is the National Day of Mourning to remember those who have died, or been left injured or ill, because of their work. Mark the day by watching the video or posting a tribute on the WSIB Day of Mourning site. Join the CCOHS social media “thunderclap.” Attend a commemorative event listed by Workers Health and Safety Centre. These are just some of the ways to mark the day.

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IWH Systematic Review Workshop—May 14-16: Only a few spots left

The Institute for Work & Health's Spring 2018 Systematic Review Workshop is set to take place May 14-16 in Toronto. Designed for clinical trainees, clinicians, decision-makers, academics and researchers, this popular workshop teaches you how to plan, conduct and communicate the results of a systematic review. If interested, please register soon. Space is limited and almost full.

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IWH now accepting applications for Syme fellowships

The Institute for Work & Health is now accepting applications for its 2018-2019 S. Leonard Syme Training Fellowships in Work & Health. The fellowships are for early-career researchers at the master's or doctoral level intending to study work and health. Typically, the Institute awards three fellowships of $5,000 each competition, although it occasionally awards one major fellowship of up to $15,000. The deadline for applications is June 8.

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IWH economist provides business case for hiring workers with mental illness

A summary report released today the Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC), A clear business case for hiring aspiring workers, suggests opening the doors to aspiring workers living with mental illness is a win-win for employers and employees. The report summarizes an in-depth MHCC research study that examined the costs and benefits of recruiting and retaining people living with mental illness. Institute for Work & Health Senior Scientist Dr. Emile Tompa conducted the cost-benefit analysis for the study. According to the report, employer’s projected net savings over the five-year span due to accommodating a worker ranged from approximately $56,000 to $204,000.

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Now recruiting: managers who have accommodated workers with chronic diseases

We need your help. If you’re a manager or supervisor with experience accommodating employees with chronic physical or mental health conditions, we’d like to hear from you for a study on talking about workplace accommodation needs. Tell us about the challenges you faced supporting employees with chronic health conditions while also balancing privacy concerns. Your participation would consist of a confidential phone interview of about 30 to 40 minutes. If you’re interested, please email jbowring@iwh.on.ca or call 1-855-884-1416.