What's new

Graphic of supervisor, with "supervisors matter" in text
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Supervisor’s response to work injury matters to return to work: Our latest video

Supervisors are busy. They’re always juggling multiple demands for their time and attention. But that moment when they learn a worker is injured, do they react with concern and empathy or blame and skepticism? As the latest research-based video from the Institute sums up, a supervisor’s response can make a difference to whether an injured worker returns to work successfully within a few months. It’s one of the ways supervisors matter.

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IWH’s Dr. Arif Jetha promoted to scientist

Congratulations to Dr. Arif Jetha, who has been promoted from associate scientist to scientist at the Institute. Jetha, who joined IWH in 2015 as a Mustard post-doctoral fellow, focuses his research on life-course differences in the work participation of people living with chronic disabling conditions, with a particular interest in the early labour market experiences of millennial young adults. Details about Jetha’s projects are available on his IWH website bio page.

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Topic pages now posted on the IWH website

Looking for research findings and resources on our website about a particular topic? Try our “Selected topics” page. You'll find it under “Our research” on the drop-down menu. From aging to young workers, from cannabis to violence at work, from health care to construction, we might just have the collection of research summaries, journal articles, tools and presentations on your topic of interest.

Sticky note clipped to a notebook reads "welcome aboard"
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Link between “newness” and higher injury risk confirmed by systematic review

Workers new to a job, regardless of their age, face higher risks of injury. This workplace health and safety message is based on several studies—including some by the Institute for Work & Health (IWH)—and it has spread far and wide. However, it was only recently that a systematic review on newness and injury risk was carried out. The review, conducted by IWH, confirms a link between newness and the risk of acute injuries—but is inconclusive on the link between newness and the risk of musculoskeletal disorders.

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Understanding the types of workplaces that offer both OHS and wellness programs

Research suggests that occupational health and safety (OHS) and health promotion programs provide greater benefits to workers’ overall health when they are integrated within an organization’s health and safety strategy. To learn about the types of workplaces where such integration might be easier to implement, a new IWH study set out to learn the common characteristics of Ontario workplaces that offer both. Findings are now summarized in a new Research Highlights.

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The summer 2019 issue of At Work is out

The latest issue of the Institute for Work & Health's quarterly newsletter, At Work, is now out. In the Summer 2019 issue, read about retirement expectations among boomers with chronic conditions, the use of IWH's leading indicators in a health and safety assessment tool built for Manitoba's building construction employers, the economic case for raising worker awareness about caregiving supports, and more. 

Two grey-haired workers have a discussion
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What an aging workforce means for injury and RTW outcomes

As the average age of Canadian workers continues to rise, employers may wonder about the effects on work injury, recovery, return to work and remaining at work. Some may expect that risks of injury are higher among older workers, that their injuries are more severe, or that timelines to recover and return to work are longer. However, findings from recent studies, including several conducted at IWH, paint a more nuanced picture. We summarized the evidence in an article published this spring in the Ontario Occupational Health Nurses Association (OOHNA) Journal.

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When and how do financial incentives work to encourage the hiring of people with disabilities?

Wage subsidies and other financial supports are widely used by Canadian governments to encourage employers to hire people with disabilities. Yet, employers, disability advocates, service providers and people with disabilities hold strong and often polarized views about the merits of these incentives. What's more, the research on the effectiveness of these policy instruments is surprisingly scarce. That's why an IWH team, in a new research project, is setting out to produce guidelines and resources on best use of financial incentives.  

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IWH appoints Dr. Avi Biswas to scientific ranks

Congratulations to Dr. Aviroop Biswas, who joined the Institute as associate scientist in May, when he completed his two-year Mustard post-doctoral fellowship at IWH. Biswas holds a PhD in health services research at the University of Toronto’s Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation. He was a recipient of a doctoral research fellowship from the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute and the University of Toronto’s Ted Goldberg Award for academic excellence and promise in health services research.

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Psychosocial work conditions linked with both positive and negative mental health outcomes, study finds

Better psychosocial work conditions—greater job control, social support and job security—are linked with workers having reduced risks of mental disorders such as depression and anxiety. But a new study by IWH suggests they’re also linked with a greater likelihood of workers having flourishing mental health. Indeed, psychosocial work factors have a stronger link to positive mental well-being than to the likelihood of poor mental health.