What's new

An older female worker ponders decision while sitting in waiting room
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Webinar now available: Supporting older workers to stay at work

Many older workers don't want to retire, but they may have support needs they don't want to disclose. How do employers provide these workers support and help them stay on the job? On September 20, at the first IWH Speaker Series webinar of the season, Senior Scientist Dr. Monique Gignac shared insights from a recent study. The webinar is now available to watch on-demand.

A visually impaired businesswoman uses smartphone and earphones during a business meeting
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New initiative aims to ‘skill up’ employers on inclusion of persons with disabilities

Efforts to date to improve the employment of persons with disabilities have focused on making them job-ready. A new initiative, a joint project at the Institute for Work & Health (IWH) and McMaster University, now sets out to flip that approach on its head. It aims to “skill up” workplaces instead.  

Screen grab of the video displays the title, "Challenge 1: Impact of advanced digital technologies"
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Join study on future challenges for young workers with disabilities

An ongoing study at the Institute for Work & Health identified six key challenges that young people with disabilities are expected to face in the future of work. In a series of short videos, we describe six major trends that are expected to shape employment for vulnerable workers over the next 10 years—and the program or policies that have the potential to protect these workers. Watch the first video and take part in the study.  

Cover image of At Work 109 (Summer 2022)
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At Work Summer 2022 is out!

The Summer 2022 issue of At Work is out. If you did not get it in your inbox, make sure to subscribe. 

A young worker at her computer workstation holds her shoulder and neck in pain
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Study examines links between job conditions and rheumatic disease symptoms

Can work and labour market conditions be linked to worsened rheumatic symptoms in young adults with the disease? Most studies aimed at removing work barriers for young people with rheumatic diseases have focused on clinical care—not on adapting working conditions. An IWH study examined how job security and work limitations are linked with pain, fatigue and other rheumatic disease symptoms.

A woman takes notes at a desk while attending a videoconference on the computer monitor
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How does real-time online training compare with face-to-face formats?

When much of work-related training went virtual during the COVID-19 pandemic, providers of occupational health and safety training naturally began asking questions about the effectiveness of online real-time formats. In a recent study, a research team at the Institute for Work & Health reviewed the research literature to date. So how does synchronous or real-time online learning compare with face-to-face methods? A new plain-language summary outlines the evidence.

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Call for new Board members closes August 12

Don't miss this opportunity to play a part in the governance of the Institute for Work & Health. The Institute's Board of Directors is looking for new members. Please help us spread the word by forwarding this call for members to qualified individuals. Submissions are accepted until Friday, August 12.

Blurred figures of workers walking
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How daily movement patterns are linked to heart health of workers

How much physical activity do Canadian workers actually do in a day, and when? And what patterns of movement are associated with lower risks of cardiovascular disease? An Institute for Work & Health (IWH) study drew on activity tracker data to answer these questions. It found that people who were sedentary—i.e. who did little physical activity throughout the day—had the highest risk of heart disease compared to most other groups. No surprise there. What is surprising, however, was how their heart health risk compared with those who did vigorous, tiring work all day.

Black silhouettes of two women in dialogue, with colourful speech bubbles above them
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Return-to-work communication: workplace stakeholders share their strategies

Communication is central to disability management, especially in large and complex organizations where communication challenges can be exacerbated by the involvement of multiple parties and inconsistent practices. An IWH research team set out to better understand the strategies used by workplace stakeholders to effectively communicate return-to-work (RTW) issues. Their insights are now summed up in the latest Research Highlights.

A man and a woman work together to push a trolley through a warehouse
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New review sums up sex/gender differences in work injury and illness outcomes

Men and women may be part of the labour force in roughly equal proportions. But many jobs and industries are still dominated by one sex/gender or another. In that light, a new systematic review at IWH looks at how work exposures and injury/illness outcomes are different for men and women.