What's new

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Ontario employers: tell us about your experience hiring newcomers

Employers play an important role in both hiring and subsequently providing safe work environments for recent immigrants. Researchers at the Institute for Work & Health want to understand the opportunities and challenges employers experience regarding work integration of newcomers, and their resource needs to help newcomers stay safe at work. We invite you to help by participating in a research study that examines the experiences and expectations of employers in relation to hiring and training recent immigrants and refugees in Ontario.

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Sign up now for IWH’s systematic review workshop in May

Learn how to plan, conduct and communicate the results of a systematic review from the best in the field. Registration is now open for the Institute’s yearly systematic review workshop, taking place May 15-17 in Toronto. Taught by experts from IWH and Cochrane Back and Neck, this three-day workshop is intended for clinical trainees, clinicians, decision-makers, academics and researchers (epidemiologists, statisticians) with a general interest in the methodology of systematic reviews and for those planning to conduct a systematic review in the future. Registration closes April 24 or when the workshop is full.

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World Congress 2020 releases first program, opens registration

Connect with global leaders on emerging challenges, innovative solutions and best practices in workplace injury and illness prevention. The World Congress on Safety & Health at Work is coming to Toronto on October 4-7, 2020. Registration is now open, and the first program announcement is now available at the World Congress 2020 website. This global forum, designed for OHS leaders, policy-makers, employers and advocates, is organized by the International Labour Organization and the International Social Security Association, in conjunction with the Canadian co-hosts, IWH and the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety. 

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Supportive supervisors help reduce risks when workers face hazards, lack protection

Workers are vulnerable to injuries or illnesses when they're exposed to hazards and lacking protective factors such as OHS policies, awareness or empowerment. However, supportive supervisors can help lower the likelihood of injuries even when workers are vulnerable, according to a new study.

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On RSI Day, access your eOfficeErgo training in French

February 28 is International Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI) Awareness Day. To help your workplace raise awareness about safe and healthy workstation practices, the Institute for Work & Health (IWH) brings you eOfficeErgo, an evidence-based and standard-compliant online ergonomics training program designed for people who regularly use computers on the job. In time for RSI Day, this free e-learning program is also now available in French, thanks to the support of l’Association paritaire pour la santé et la sécurité du travail du secteur affaires sociales (ASSTSAS).

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The Winter 2019 issue of At Work is out

In the latest issue of At Work, read about the role supervisors can play in lessening injury risks, even when workers are vulnerable due to hazard exposure and inadequate protection. Learn about a draft pan-Canadian strategy on improving work opportunities for people with disabilities, now being circulated for feedback from a broad cross-section of stakeholders. Also, baby boomers with arthritis or diabetes are not that different from healthy peers in how much they need, or use, workplace accommodations.

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IWH Speaker Series: Evaluating the effectiveness of Ontario’s working-at-heights training standards

Serious injuries and fatalities resulting from falls from heights are a major concern in construction work. In 2015, Ontario’s Ministry of Labour implemented regulations defining working-at-heights training program standards and establishing a program for approving training providers in the province. In an IWH Speaker Series presentation on February 26, Scientist Dr. Lynda Robson shares findings from a study examining the reach and effectiveness of this training initiative.

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Better disease, exposure surveillance key to progress on occupational disease prevention: Nachemson lecturer

For every person who dies from a work-related traumatic injury, at least six people die from an occupational disease. Fittingly, preventing the work exposures behind these diseases is a priority in many jurisdictions, including Ontario. But to push forward on this agenda, we need to build up our disease and exposure surveillance systems, Occupational Cancer Research Centre (OCRC) Director Dr. Paul Demers noted in his remarks last November at the 2018 annual Alf Nachemson Memorial Lecture, hosted by IWH. His Nachemson lecture is now available as a slidecast.

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IWH applauds appointment of occupational cancer expert to lead review

The Institute for Work & Health (IWH) congratulates Ontario Minister of Labour Laurie Scott for her appointment of Dr. Paul Demers, director of the Occupational Cancer Research Centre in Toronto, to lead a review of the scientific evidence on the role of workplace exposures in causing cancers among Ontario workers. In a letter to the Minister, IWH President Cam Mustard says he expects the review will have influence in provincial jurisdictions across Canada.

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Ontario Mining Association endorses safety climate and assessment audit tool

A tool designed to measure "two sides of the coin"—OHS systems and culture—developed by Workplace Safety North with Institute for Work & Health expertise, has been endorsed by the Ontario Mining Association, and now is in demand well beyond the province and the sector.