Understanding patient profiles and characteristics of current chiropractic practice: a cross-sectional Ontario Chiropractic Observation and Analysis STudy (O-COAST)

Publication type
Journal article
Authors
Mior S Wong J Sutton D Beliveau PJH Bussières A Hogg-Johnson S French S
Date published
2019 Aug 01
Journal
BMJ Open
Volume
9
Issue
8
Pages
e029851
Open Access?
Yes
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: There is no current detailed profile of people seeking chiropractic care in Canada. We describe the profiles of chiropractors' practice and the reasons, nature of the care provided to their patients and extent of interprofessional collaborations in Ontario, Canada. DESIGN: Cross-sectional observational study. SETTING: Primary care setting in Ontario, Canada. PARTICIPANTS: We randomly recruited chiropractors from a list of registered chiropractors (n=3978) in active practice in 2015. Of the 135 randomly selected chiropractors, 120 were eligible, 43 participated and 42 completed the study. OUTCOME MEASURES: Each chiropractor recorded information for up to 100 consecutive patient encounters, documenting patient health profiles, reasons for encounter, diagnoses and care provided. Descriptive statistics summarised chiropractor, patient and encounter characteristics, with analyses accounting for clustering and design effects. RESULTS: Chiropractors provided data on 3523 chiropractor-patient encounters. More than 65% of participating chiropractors were male, mean age 44 years and had practised on average 15 years. The typical patient was female (59% of encounters), between 45 and 64 years (43%) and retired (21%) or employed in business and administration (13%). Most (39.4%) referrals were from other patients, with 6.8% from physicians. Approximately 68% of patients paid out of pocket or claimed extended health insurance for care. Most common diagnoses were back (49%, 95% CI 44 to 56) and neck (15%, 95% CI 13 to 18) problems, with few encounters related to maintenance/preventive care (0.86%, 95% CI 0.2 to 3.9) and non-musculoskeletal problems (1.3%, 95% CI 0.7 to 2.3). The most common treatments included spinal manipulation (72%), soft tissue therapy (70%) and mobilisation (35%). CONCLUSIONS: This is the most comprehensive profile to date of chiropractic practice in Canada. People who present to Ontario chiropractors are mostly adults with a musculoskeletal condition. Our results can be used by stakeholders to make informed decisions about workforce development, education and healthcare policy related to chiropractic care