Dr. Cameron Mustard

President & Senior Scientist
Doctor of Science, School of Hygiene and Public Health, The Johns Hopkins University
Staff email
Staff extension
416-927-2027 ext. 2143

Dr. Cameron Mustard is the president and a senior scientist at the Institute for Work & Health. He is also a professor in the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto.

Mustard completed his doctoral training in epidemiology, health policy and behavioural sciences at The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health in 1990. Prior to joining the Institute in 1999, he was a member of the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy and Evaluation at the University of Manitoba.

Mustard's current research interests include work environments, labour market experiences and health, the distributional equity of publicly funded health and health care programs in Canada, and the epidemiology of socioeconomic health inequalities across the human life course.

Photo of Cameron Mustard

"The Institute for Work & Health is dedicated to conducting research that can be applied in workplaces to improve the health and safety of working people." – Dr. Cameron Mustard

Publications

Macpherson RA, Koehoorn M, Fan J, Quirke W, Amick B, Kraut A, Mustard C, McLeod CB. Do differences in work disability duration between men and women vary by province in Canada?. Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation. 2018 [Epub ahead of print]. doi:10.1007/s10926-018-9819-1.
Mustard C, Tompa E, Landsman V, Lay M. What do employers spend to protect the health of workers?. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health. 2018 [Epub ahead of print]. doi:10.5271/sjweh.3778.
Chen C, Smith PM, Mustard C. Gender differences in injuries attributed to workplace violence in Ontario 2002-2015. Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 2018 [Epub ahead of print]. doi:10.1136/oemed-2018-105152.
Gilbert-Ouimet M, Ma H, Glazier R, Brisson C, Mustard C, Smith PM. Adverse effect of long work hours on incident diabetes in 7065 Ontario workers followed for 12 years. BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care. 2018;6(1):e000496. doi:10.1136/bmjdrc-2017-000496.