Aging workers

As fertility rates fall and life expectancy climbs, the average age of Canada’s population continues to rise. This has widespread implications for social policies and the world of work. IWH research explores these implications, such as the effects of aging on work ability, injury rates, injury and disease prevention, productivity, accommodation and return to work. It also looks at the workplace and social programs that will allow aging workers to remain at work in a healthy and productive way until they transition into retirement.

Featured

An older female worker ponders decision while sitting in waiting room
At Work article

Older workers not prone to ask for employer support, citing ageism and other issues

Many older workers are in no hurry to retire, but they may have support needs they're reluctant to divulge. An IWH team explores the reasons and suggests ways workplaces can provide support despite the absence of disclosure.
Published: November 7, 2022
A woman works at a laundry service
At Work article

Precarity more likely for older, new workers with disabilities

An IWH study finds the risks of working in precarious jobs are the same for people with and without disabilities. But among people with disabilities, precarity is more likely when people are older or have less job tenure.
Published: March 3, 2021
Canadian HR Reporter logo
IWH in the media

Older employees reluctant to ask for support: study

When it comes to asking for support on the job, either due to health or family-related reasons, a deep hesitation is present among older workers, John Dujay reports.
Published: Canadian HR Reporter, November 2022
An older female worker ponders decision while sitting in waiting room
At Work article

Older workers not prone to ask for employer support, citing ageism and other issues

Many older workers are in no hurry to retire, but they may have support needs they're reluctant to divulge. An IWH team explores the reasons and suggests ways workplaces can provide support despite the absence of disclosure.
Published: November 2022
IWH Speaker Series
IWH Speaker Series

What do workplaces need to know to help older workers stay on the job? A qualitative study of older workers’ disclosure decisions

Historic labour shortages are affecting every Canadian job sector. Many workers aged 50 years or more want to work longer, often beyond the traditional retirement age. However, we understand little about the different workplace support needs they may have and whether workers choose to share their needs with others—especially given the negative stereotypes that often surround older workers. In this presentation, Dr. Monique Gignac shares insights from her study on older workers’ workplace support needs and disclosure decisions. She highlights how workplaces can help older workers stay on the job, regardless of whether they disclose their needs.
Published: September 2022
A woman works at a laundry service
At Work article

Precarity more likely for older, new workers with disabilities

An IWH study finds the risks of working in precarious jobs are the same for people with and without disabilities. But among people with disabilities, precarity is more likely when people are older or have less job tenure.
Published: March 2021
Journal article
Journal article

Age differences in return-to-work following injury: understanding the role of age dimensions across longitudinal follow-up

Published: Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine, December 2020
Journal article
Journal article

The working disadvantaged: the role of age, job tenure and disability in precarious work

Published: BMC Public Health, December 2020
A large group of seniors looking at camera
At Work article

Understanding employment patterns among older workers in four countries

In many developed countries, including Canada, encouraging older workers to stay in the workforce is a common policy goal. But what do we know about current work participation patterns among people older than 65? A new study involving IWH looks at data in Canada, the U.K., Denmark and Sweden.
Published: October 2019
Canadian HR Reporter logo
IWH in the media

Chronic diseases not slowing down older workers

Personal health may be a factor for older workers in deciding when to retire, but it’s not as big a factor as previously thought, according to a new Institute for Work & Health study. Despite experiencing more pain and fatigue, older workers with arthritis, diabetes or both were no different from their healthy peers in their retirement plans, writes John Dujay.
Published: Canadian HR Reporter, August 2019