Construction sector

IWH research that specifically involves construction workplaces, workers, unions, employers and/or associations, as well as research on programs that specifically target the construction sector, is collected together here. Not included is IWH research that cuts across all or many sectors, even though it may be relevant to the construction sector. For this reason, visitors are encouraged to explore beyond this page to find equally important information on the prevention of work injury and disability in construction.

Featured

Construction equipment amid dusk and haze
At Work article

Comparing the costs, benefits of silica dust prevention methods for construction workers

Construction workplaces can use different methods to reduce exposure to silica dust and protect workers from cancer down the road. But which methods should they opt for? A cost-benefit analysis led by IWH offers some guidance.
Published: August 20, 2020
A form being filled out, next to a stack of binders and a safety helmet
At Work article

Employers certified by COR programs have greater reduction in injury rates: studies

Although COR programs are offered in most provinces and territories across the country, little research has been done on their effectiveness. A research program recently examined workers' compensation data in B.C. and Alberta for links between certification and injury rates.
Published: November 12, 2019
IWH Speaker Series
A lone roofing worker sits perched on top of a new being built
Research Highlights

Evaluating the effectiveness of mandatory working-at-heights training standards

The introduction of a mandatory training standard for construction workers using fall protection equipment is associated with a 19.6 per cent reduction in the incidence rate of lost-time claims due to falls targeted by the intervention. This decline is larger than an overall decline in injuries in the sector during the same time frame. Reductions in incidence rates are also largest among the smallest employers.
Published: September 2020
Journal article
Journal article

Preventing fall-from-height injuries in construction: effectiveness of a regulatory training standard

Published: Journal of Safety Research, September 2020
Construction equipment amid dusk and haze
At Work article

Comparing the costs, benefits of silica dust prevention methods for construction workers

Construction workplaces can use different methods to reduce exposure to silica dust and protect workers from cancer down the road. But which methods should they opt for? A cost-benefit analysis led by IWH offers some guidance.
Published: August 2020
A form being filled out, next to a stack of binders and a safety helmet
At Work article

Employers certified by COR programs have greater reduction in injury rates: studies

Although COR programs are offered in most provinces and territories across the country, little research has been done on their effectiveness. A research program recently examined workers' compensation data in B.C. and Alberta for links between certification and injury rates.
Published: November 2019
IWH Speaker Series
IWH Speaker Series

The effectiveness of COR in preventing work injury: lessons from Alberta and B.C.

Certificate of Recognition (COR) programs are voluntary audits that recognize employers for having strong occupational health and safety (OHS) practices. In this presentation, IWH Scientist Dr. Chris McLeod shares his research in British Columbia and Alberta on the effectiveness of COR programs in preventing work-related injury.
Published: November 2019
A bird's eye view of a construction work site
At Work article

Construction safety association develops OHS assessment tool with IWH’s expertise

Building construction employers in Manitoba can now use an evidence-based online dashboard to assess their OHS performance⁠—and see how it stacks up against those of industry peers⁠—thanks to a collaboration between IWH and a sector safety association.
Published: July 2019
Toronto Sun logo
IWH in the media

Guest column: T.O. council's decision on construction tendering makes sense

On June 19th , Toronto City Council voted overwhelmingly to maintain its contractual relationship with the province’s major construction union. It's a longstanding relationship that militates towards high quality work, safer job sites and a robust training sector, writes guest columnist Phil Gillies, who points to IWH research on the union safety effect to support one of his arguments.
Published: Toronto Sun, July 2019