Economic evaluations

Economic evaluations in health and safety calculate the costs and benefits of injury, illness and disability prevention programs, both workplace-based and at the systems level. IWH researchers not only answer questions about how and what to measure in an economic evaluation, but also conduct economic evaluations themselves as part of larger studies determining the effectiveness (in terms of both costs and other benefits) of occupational health and safety, return-to-work and other work-related programs that affect health.

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A man looks at a blackboard with chalk written money symbols and question marks
At Work article

Calculating the costs of employers’ work-related injury prevention efforts in Ontario

New IWH Issue Briefing lays out estimates of employer spending on worker health and safety in 17 sectors
Published: November 7, 2018
Abstract image of one open door, flanked by many closed doors
At Work article

Benefits outweigh costs for workplaces that accommodate people with mental illness

Business case study finds accommodations are a net gain for employers and workers
Published: July 30, 2018
Journal article
Journal article

What do employers spend to protect the health of workers?

Published: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health, April 2019
A man looks at a blackboard with chalk written money symbols and question marks
At Work article

Calculating the costs of employers’ work-related injury prevention efforts in Ontario

You often hear OHS professionals and advocates talk about the costs of work-related injuries. But what about the costs of preventing the injuries? An IWH research team recently set out to calculate employer OHS investments in Ontario.
Published: November 2018
Journal article
Journal article

Cost-benefit analysis of investment in occupational health and safety in Colombian companies

Published: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, October 2018
A man looks at a blackboard with chalk written money symbols and question marks
Issue Briefing

What do employers spend to protect the health and safety of workers?

While the financial costs of work-related injury and illness are well known, limited information is available on what employers spend to control or eliminate the causes of work-related injury and illness. This Issue Briefing describes the results of a 2017 study to estimate occupational health and safety expenditures among employers from 17 economic sectors in Ontario, Canada.
Published: September 2018
Journal article
Journal article

The economic burden of occupational non-melanoma skin cancer due to solar radiation

Published: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, September 2018
Abstract image of one open door, flanked by many closed doors
At Work article

Benefits outweigh costs for workplaces that accommodate people with mental illness

For employers, the economic benefits of hiring and accommodating workers with mental illnesses range from two to seven dollars for every dollar spent. That's according to a new study on the business case of accommodating mental illnesses.
Published: July 2018
Young landscaping worker holds hedge trimmer
At Work article

IWH study estimates costs of non-melanoma skin cancers due to sun exposure at work

IWH economist and senior scientist conducted the first estimate of the economic burden of non-melanoma skin cancers from work-related sun exposure in Canada.
Published: April 2018
Science Daily logo
IWH in the media

Hidden costs of skin cancer caused by workplace sun exposure revealed

Skin cancer cases attributable to work-related sun exposure could be costing millions of dollars, and must be better addressed by policymakers, according to a study published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene.
Published: Science Daily, April 2018
Journal article
Journal article

The economic burden of bladder cancer due to occupational exposure

Published: Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine, March 2018