Gender, work and health

Gender and sex play an important role in determining work experiences, as well as health experiences in the wake of a work-related injury or disease. (“Gender” typically refers to socially constructed roles, relationships, behaviours, relative power and other traits that societies ascribe to women, men and people of diverse gender identities. “Sex” is typically understood to refer to the biological and physiological characteristics that distinguish females from males.) IWH research seeks to understand these experiences—in particular the effects and outcomes of occupational exposures related to these experiences—in order to develop gender- and sex-sensitive policies and practices to improve the health of all working Canadians.

Featured

Close-up image of shattered glass window
At Work article

Workplace violence against women rising, driven by growing rates in education sector

Risks of workplace violence for men in health care on the decline, now lower than risks for female educators
Published: April 12, 2019
A professional woman pushes an older person in a wheelchair in the outdoors
At Work article

Women’s work more likely than men’s to be disrupted due to caring for older relatives

IWH study finds women 73 per cent more likely than men to permanently leave a job due to eldercare
Published: April 11, 2019
A professional woman pushes an older person in a wheelchair in the outdoors
Research Highlights

Gender differences in the impact of eldercare on work

Women are much more likely than men to stop working, to work part time and to temporarily take time off work in order to care for an older relative. These differences are seen even after taking into account factors such as marital status, having children, hours of work, pay level, job tenure, and status as main wage earner in the household.
Published: June 2019
Close-up image of shattered glass window
At Work article

Workplace violence against women rising, driven by growing rates in education sector

Men working in health care were once the group most at risk of workplace violence. These day, it's women working in education who face the highest risks of being assaulted on the job.
Published: April 2019
A professional woman pushes an older person in a wheelchair in the outdoors
At Work article

Women’s work more likely than men’s to be disrupted due to caring for older relatives

Women are 73 per cent more likely than men to permanently leave a job due to eldercare responsibilities. They're also five times more likely to work part time to care for their older relatives, a new IWH study has found.
Published: April 2019
Journal article
Journal article

Male/female differences in the impact of caring for elderly relatives on labor market attachment and hours of work: 1997-2015

Published: The Journals of Gerontology. Series B, Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, April 2019
Journal article
Journal article

Dissecting the effect of workplace exposures on workers' rating of psychological health and safety

Published: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, March 2019
Journal article
Journal article
Journal article

The power of a photograph to capture many truths in occupational health

Published: Annals of Work Exposures and Health, February 2019
Journal article
Journal article

Gender differences in injuries attributed to workplace violence in Ontario 2002-2015

Published: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, January 2019