Gender, work and health

Gender and sex play an important role in determining work experiences, as well as health experiences in the wake of a work-related injury or disease. (“Gender” typically refers to socially constructed roles, relationships, behaviours, relative power and other traits that societies ascribe to women, men and people of diverse gender identities. “Sex” is typically understood to refer to the biological and physiological characteristics that distinguish females from males.) IWH research seeks to understand these experiences—in particular the effects and outcomes of occupational exposures related to these experiences—in order to develop gender- and sex-sensitive policies and practices to improve the health of all working Canadians.

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Journal article

Disability and sex/gender intersections in unmet workplace support needs: findings from a large Canadian survey of workers

Published: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, February 2021
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Journal article
Journal article

Age differences in work-disability duration across Canada: examining variations by follow-up time and context

Published: Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation, September 2020
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Changes in work factors and concurrent changes in leisure time physical activity: a 12-year longitudinal analysis

Published: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, February 2020
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Journal article

Male/female differences in the impact of caring for elderly relatives on labor market attachment and hours of work: 1997-2015

Published: The Journals of Gerontology. Series B, Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, February 2020
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Journal article
Journal article

Men and women at work in Canada, 1991-2016

Published: Labour & Industry, January 2020