Research that matters to protecting the health and safety of workers

The Institute for Work & Health (IWH) is a Canadian leader in work injury and disability prevention research. An independent, not-for-profit organization, IWH conducts and shares actionable research to promote, protect and improve the health and safety of working people.

Latest news & findings

When and how do financial incentives work to encourage the hiring of people with disabilities?

Wage subsidies and other financial supports are widely used by Canadian governments to encourage employers to hire people with disabilities. Yet, employers, disability advocates, service providers and people with disabilities hold strong and often polarized views about the merits of these incentives. What's more, the research on the effectiveness of these policy instruments is surprisingly scarce. That's why an IWH team, in a new research project, is setting out to produce guidelines and resources on best use of financial incentives.  

Read about this project

Dr. Avi Biswas

IWH appoints Dr. Avi Biswas to scientific ranks

Congratulations to Dr. Aviroop Biswas, who joined the Institute as associate scientist in May, when he completed his two-year Mustard post-doctoral fellowship at IWH. Biswas holds a PhD in health services research at the University of Toronto’s Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation. He was a recipient of a doctoral research fellowship from the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute and the University of Toronto’s Ted Goldberg Award for academic excellence and promise in health services research.

See Dr. Avi Biswas’s bio page

A silhouette of two palms held upward, cupping the sun

Psychosocial work conditions linked with both positive and negative mental health outcomes, study finds

Better psychosocial work conditions—greater job control, social support and job security—are linked with workers having reduced risks of mental disorders such as depression and anxiety. But a new study by IWH suggests they’re also linked with a greater likelihood of workers having flourishing mental health. Indeed, psychosocial work factors have a stronger link to positive mental well-being than to the likelihood of poor mental health.

Get the study highlights

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5 things we think you should know about RTW

Ground your return-to-work programs and policies on evidence. Every April, the Institute for Work & Health (IWH) highlights five research findings from the previous year that we think can make a difference to workplace injury and disability prevention programs. We now unveil a new variation, "5 things we think you should know about RTW." It sums up five recommendations for improving your return-to-work and stay-at-work practices, based on recent research from IWH.  

Get the handout

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World Congress 2020, a global forum on emerging OHS issues, coming to Toronto

Occupational health and safety (OHS) professionals, get ready to take a break from the day-to-day issues and take in the big picture. In a little over a year, the most forward-thinking OHS policy-makers and practitioners from around the globe will gather in Toronto for the XXII World Congress on Safety and Health at Work. With the theme "Prevention in the Connected Age," the October 4-7, 2020, event will be your chance to hear and share ideas about the OHS challenges and innovations coming over the horizon.  

Find out more

IN THE CURRENT ISSUE...

Ontario’s mandatory working-at-heights training standard has led to safer practices and lower injury claims rates.

Women’s work is more likely than men’s to be disrupted due to eldercare responsibilities.

Workplace violence against women is rising, driven by growing rates in the education sector.

Read the issue

Tools and guides

Integrate evidence-based policies and practices into your occupational health and safety, return-to-work and rehabilitation programs. IWH has created a number of tools and guides based on our research findings that can help improve program outcomes.

View tools and guides

Impact case studies

Find out how IWH research is making a difference. Read our impact case studies, in which policy-makers, workplaces and other stakeholders in health, safety and disability prevention tell how IWH research helped improve their policies, programs and practices.

Go to case studies

Research summaries

Whether it’s a policy briefing, a systematic review summary or the highlights of a specific research project, we’ve compiled a number of plain-language summaries to help you understand the research we’re doing, what we have found, and how we found it.

Get the summaries

Events

Learn directly from the researchers themselves about their latest findings in health, safety and disability prevention. We host regular presentations (in person or live stream) through our IWH Speaker Series and our annual Nachemson lecture.

See upcoming events