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News release: women experience more work disruptions due to eldercare

The burden of caring for an older relative falls more on women than on men, and it’s showing up in women's higher rates of work disruption. According to a new Institute for Work & Health study, women are more likely than men to stop working, to work part-time or to take time off work during the week due to eldercare. The open access study is published in the Journals of Gerontology.  

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IWH applauds appointment of occupational cancer expert to lead review

The Institute for Work & Health (IWH) congratulates Ontario Minister of Labour Laurie Scott for her appointment of Dr. Paul Demers, director of the Occupational Cancer Research Centre in Toronto, to lead a review of the scientific evidence on the role of workplace exposures in causing cancers among Ontario workers. In a letter to the Minister, IWH President Cam Mustard says he expects the review will have influence in provincial jurisdictions across Canada.

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With IWH expertise, OHCOW develops psychosocial screening tool

Ridicule and belittlement, gossip and back-stabbing, unclear job expectations, unfair treatment, relentless work demands. Research shows that psychosocial work conditions such as the above are as serious as any other safety hazard. That was why the Occupational Health Clinics for Ontario Workers (OHCOW) set out to create a tool to help workplaces tackle psychosocial hazards. And IWH was happy to lend its tool development expertise.

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Should you mostly sit or stand at work? New IWH video has the answer

If you’re confused by seemingly duelling headlines about the negative health effects of prolonged sitting and prolonged standing, we’ve got a video for you. It just so happens that two of the scientists behind these headlines work at the Institute for Work & Health. We put them before the camera, side by side, to sort out the take-away message.

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Institute accepting applications for post-doctoral Mustard fellowships in work and health

New researchers with an expertise in social, behavioural, organizational, clinical and/or population health sciences are invited to apply for a post-doctoral Mustard Fellowship in Work & Health. The Institute is looking for recent PhD graduates with an interest in doing research related to one of its two overarching priorities: work as a determinant of health and health as a determinant of work. The deadline for applications is Friday, December 14, 2018.

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IWH Speaker Series—November 20: Clearing the haze on at-work cannabis use and perception

Recreational cannabis is now legal in Canada and many employers are concerned about the potential implications for workplaces. In this IWH Speaker Series presentation, Dr. Nancy Carnide shares early findings of a survey, conducted in June 2018, on patterns of cannabis use at work and workers' perceptions of such use. 

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Media release: Risk of workplace violence increasing among women in Ontario’s education sector

Women working in Ontario’s education sector are four to six times more likely than their male counterparts to require time off work because of being physically assaulted on the job. This is according to a study by the Toronto-based Institute for Work & Health (IWH), recently published online in Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

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Save the date: Dr. Paul Demers delivers IWH’s annual Nachemson lecture November 28

The Institute’s Alf Nachemson Memorial Lecture takes place this year on November 28. The lecture will be delivered by Dr. Paul Demers, director of the Occupational Cancer Research Centre (OCRC). In this role, Demers has been working with colleagues and collaborators across the country to develop and improve the surveillance of work-related cancers, establish their human and economic burden, and draw on research to develop policy recommendations aimed at preventing exposure. The event, to take place at the Design Exchange in downtown Toronto, is free and open to the public.

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Working long hours increases risk of diabetes in women but not men: study

Women who work 45 hours or more a week face a 63 per cent higher risk of developing diabetes than women who work 35-44 hours. Among men who work long hours, however, the incidence of diabetes tends to go down. This is according to a study by the Institute for Work & Health (IWH) and Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, which followed a sample of 7,000 Ontario workers over 12 years. The findings, published in July in an open access article in BMJ Diabetes Research & Care, highlight the importance of work and health research that includes sex/gender-based analyses.

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Skin cancers due to sun exposure at work costing Canada millions a year

As we head into another summer here in Canada, workplaces should be especially mindful of protecting outdoor workers from harmful sun exposure. An economic burden study by Institute for Work & Health (IWH) Senior Scientist Dr. Emile Tompa puts the costs in Canada of non-melanoma skin cancers due to work-related sun exposure diagnosed in just one year (2011) at almost 35 million dollars. Skin cancers are the most common form of cancer in Canada. The risks of sun exposure on the job are the highest for people doing construction, road work, farming, landscaping, and transportation and warehousing.