What's new

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The Winter 2019 issue of At Work is out

In the latest issue of At Work, read about the role supervisors can play in lessening injury risks, even when workers are vulnerable due to hazard exposure and inadequate protection. Learn about a draft pan-Canadian strategy on improving work opportunities for people with disabilities, now being circulated for feedback from a broad cross-section of stakeholders. Also, baby boomers with arthritis or diabetes are not that different from healthy peers in how much they need, or use, workplace accommodations.

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IWH Speaker Series: Evaluating the effectiveness of Ontario’s working-at-heights training standards

Serious injuries and fatalities resulting from falls from heights are a major concern in construction work. In 2015, Ontario’s Ministry of Labour implemented regulations defining working-at-heights training program standards and establishing a program for approving training providers in the province. In an IWH Speaker Series presentation on February 26, Scientist Dr. Lynda Robson shares findings from a study examining the reach and effectiveness of this training initiative.

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Better disease, exposure surveillance key to progress on occupational disease prevention: Nachemson lecturer

For every person who dies from a work-related traumatic injury, at least six people die from an occupational disease. Fittingly, preventing the work exposures behind these diseases is a priority in many jurisdictions, including Ontario. But to push forward on this agenda, we need to build up our disease and exposure surveillance systems, Occupational Cancer Research Centre (OCRC) Director Dr. Paul Demers noted in his remarks last November at the 2018 annual Alf Nachemson Memorial Lecture, hosted by IWH. His Nachemson lecture is now available as a slidecast.

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IWH applauds appointment of occupational cancer expert to lead review

The Institute for Work & Health (IWH) congratulates Ontario Minister of Labour Laurie Scott for her appointment of Dr. Paul Demers, director of the Occupational Cancer Research Centre in Toronto, to lead a review of the scientific evidence on the role of workplace exposures in causing cancers among Ontario workers. In a letter to the Minister, IWH President Cam Mustard says he expects the review will have influence in provincial jurisdictions across Canada.

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Ontario Mining Association endorses safety climate and assessment audit tool

A tool designed to measure "two sides of the coin"—OHS systems and culture—developed by Workplace Safety North with Institute for Work & Health expertise, has been endorsed by the Ontario Mining Association, and now is in demand well beyond the province and the sector.

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Draft strategy on improving employment of people with disabilities now available for feedback

Public consultation is now under way on a draft strategy for building an inclusive workforce—one where people with and without disabilities have the same choices in their jobs and careers. The organizations behind the draft strategy, hosts of the Disability and Work in Canada 2018 conference held last December in Ottawa, are hoping to gather input on the document from as many perspectives as possible.

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IWH’s Dr. Nancy Carnide promoted to associate scientist

Congratulations to Dr. Nancy Carnide, who was recently named an associate scientist at the Institute. Previously a post-doctoral fellow at IWH, Carnide was also the recipient of a Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship and a CIHR Strategic Training Fellowship in Work Disability Prevention. Her current research interests focus on substance use and mental health problems among working populations.

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Manitoba turns to IWH leading indicators in safety culture initiative

It had a five-year plan that included building a culture of safety across the province. What it was missing was a definition of safety culture—and a way to measure any progress made. That was when SAFE Work Manitoba turned to IWH and its work on occupational health and safety leading indicators. In this impact case study, we look at how the IWH Organizational Performance Metric is helping SAFE Work Manitoba achieve its goals.

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RTW outcomes improve after WSIB implements two of IWH’s Seven Principles in regional assessment service

In 2013, Ontario’s Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB) put two of IWH’s Seven ‘Principles’ for Successful Return to Work into practice when it introduced changes to the medical assessment service offered at its Regional Evaluation Centres. The new service integrates return-to-work (RTW) planning and enhances communication among health-care providers, the WSIB and the employer, with the worker’s participation. In a new impact case study, we look at the difference in recovery and RTW outcomes after the changes were put in place.

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Institute research on "the big issues" summarized in 2017 annual report

From violence to cannabis legalization to mental illness, policy-makers and occupational health and safety practitioners are challenged to stay on top of emerging societal issues that also affect the workplace. We summarize our research work on these big issues and more in the Institute’s 2017 Annual Report, now available to download.