Workplace OHS programs and practices

Workplaces play a vital role in ensuring the well-being of workers. So knowing what occupational health and safety (OHS) practices are most effective in preventing injury and illness is essential. The Institute for Work & Health (IWH) has a long history of conducting workplace-based research to provide practical guidance to employers, workers, OHS professionals and regulators about what works and what doesn’t. This research targets the injury and illness prevention practices of workplaces, as well as the programs developed by governments, health and safety associations and others to support and motivate workplaces in adopting effective practices.

Latest news and findings

Text reads: At the next IWH Speaker Series presentation... Preventing falls from heights in Ontario's construction sector Dr. Lynda Robson December 13, 2022, 11:00a.m. to noon www.iwh.on.ca Tinted background shows man working on the roof of a new residential build

IWH Speaker Series: Effectiveness of mandatory training standard to prevent falls from heights

In 2015, the Ontario government implemented a working-at-heights (WAH) training standard to ramp up fall prevention efforts. An IWH study team, led by IWH Scientist Dr. Lynda Robson, has now gathered two additional years of data on the effectiveness of this training requirement. Find out what the team learned at our next IWH Speaker Series webinar, taking place on December 13.

Sign up for the webinar
Two male workers assemble vegetable crates in a warehouse

Employers struggle to provide newcomers with OHS training and support, IWH study finds

Employers are responsible for providing occupational health and safety (OHS) training and support to keep workers safe. When it comes to workers who are new to Canada, however, workplaces face particular challenges following through on this responsibility.

Read about the study findings
Police sirens at night

Now available: New resource on return to work in policing

A resource is now available on the return-to-work (RTW) challenges in policing and ways to address them. As outlined by Dr. Dwayne Van Eerd in an IWH Speaker Series webinar on October 18, this four-page resource describes the challenges along three key themes—accommodation, communication and trust-building. This resource is intended for members, both sworn and civilian, in Ontario’s police services. 

Download the resource
A woman takes notes at a desk while attending a videoconference on the computer monitor

How does real-time online training compare with face-to-face formats?

When much of work-related training went virtual during the COVID-19 pandemic, providers of occupational health and safety training naturally began asking questions about the effectiveness of online real-time formats. In a recent study, a research team at the Institute for Work & Health reviewed the research literature to date. So how does synchronous or real-time online learning compare with face-to-face methods? A new plain-language summary outlines the evidence.

Find out more
A man and a woman work together to push a trolley through a warehouse

New review sums up sex/gender differences in work injury and illness outcomes

Men and women may be part of the labour force in roughly equal proportions. But many jobs and industries are still dominated by one sex/gender or another. In that light, a new systematic review at IWH looks at how work exposures and injury/illness outcomes are different for men and women.

See what the literature says