What's new

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Institute accepting applications for post-doctoral Mustard fellowships in work and health

New researchers with an expertise in social, behavioural, organizational, clinical and/or population health sciences are invited to apply for a post-doctoral Mustard Fellowship in Work & Health. The Institute is looking for recent PhD graduates with an interest in doing research related to one of its two overarching priorities: work as a determinant of health and health as a determinant of work. The deadline for applications is Friday, December 14, 2018.

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Now hiring: Research analyst for one-year contract

We are seeking a research analyst for a 12-month, full-time contract to be part of a project examining the concept of occupational health and safety (OHS) vulnerability across provinces. Deadline for applications is Friday, October 5.

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Boost OHS training outcomes with embedded essential skills content

Are you concerned that literacy or numeracy skills gaps among workers would get in the way of their uptake of job skills or OHS training? If so, embedding essential skills content in the job or OHS training could help. Our recent study of hoisting and rigging learners showed better scores among those who took the training with embedded essential skills. A guide based on that research is now available to download.

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Work, Migration and Health Forum—May 8-9: IWH researcher discusses newcomers and OHS

In Canada, migrant workers and newcomers are among those disproportionally affected by precarious employment. On May 8-9, the Work, Migration and Health Forum will examine the labour experiences of Canada’s migrants and newcomers, including temporary foreign workers, new immigrants, refugees, international students and undocumented migrants. IWH’s Dr. Basak Yanar, one of the keynote speakers, discusses newcomers’ experiences looking for work and finding information about health and safety. Registration is free for newcomers and migrants.

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Study: Newcomers often lack OHS protection and information in their precarious first jobs

Four themes emerged in an Institute for Work & Health study on the labour market experiences of newcomers to Canada: they have great difficulty finding work; their first jobs are often precarious; they rely heavily on community networks; and their knowledge of workplace health and safety is limited. The researchers suggest more settlement agencies offer OHS information as a regular part of their language training and employment preparation services, as some already do.

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IWH Speaker Series—March 27: Differences in risk of workplace violence for women and men

Workplace violence is getting increasing attention, especially in sectors such as health care and education. On March 27, IWH Speaker Series presents Institute for Work & Health Senior Scientist Dr. Peter Smith, who will talk about two of his recent studies on differences in the risk of workplace violence for men and women. One examined the contribution of work-related factors to the risk of different types of violence, and the other examined risks in different Ontario industries.

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Join us May 8-9 at Work, Migration & Health Forum

On May 8 and 9, 2018, join researchers, advocates and policy-makers in Toronto at the Work, Health and Migration Forum. The event, hosted by the Occupational Health Clinics for Ontario Workers (OHCOW) and the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, is examining the labour experiences of temporary foreign workers, new immigrants, refugees, working international students and undocumented migrants. IWH and Wellesley Institute are sponsoring the event.

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People with disabilities face greater OHS vulnerability, according to IWH study

People with disabilities have a tough time getting hired, research elsewhere has shown. Now, a new IWH study suggests that, when they do find jobs, they may be more vulnerable to workplace health and safety risks than their peers without disabilities. The study used an occupational health and safety (OHS) vulnerability framework developed at IWH. It found low OHS empowerment and inadequate OHS practices and policies were more prevalent among study participants with disabilities than those without.

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How IWH researchers addressed essential skills gaps in an OHS training program

Can an OHS training program be improved by modifying it to address gaps in essential skills? In a new study, a research team at IWH pilot-tested a modified version of a hoisting and rigging training program offered by the Labourers’ International Union of North America (LiUNA) Local 506. The changes were made to address trainees’ skills gaps in numeracy and document use that were related to the job. Last November, the team presented its findings, and that presentation is now available as a slidecast. Good news: it turns out the trainees in the program modified to address essential skills did better.

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Watch: IWH presentations at the 2017 Research & Policy Forum on Immigration, Work & Health

Are immigrants more vulnerable to workplace hazards than Canadian-born workers? What can we do to promote the safe integration of newcomers into the labour market? How do workers with limited English proficiency navigate the workers’ compensation system after an injury? Studies on these research questions were recently presented at the 2017 Research & Policy Forum on Immigration, Work & Health at Toronto’s city hall. Those lectures are now available as slidecasts.