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Institute accepting applications for post-doctoral Mustard fellowships in work and health

New researchers with an expertise in social, behavioural, organizational, clinical and/or population health sciences are invited to apply for a post-doctoral Mustard Fellowship in Work & Health. The Institute is looking for recent PhD graduates with an interest in doing research related to one of its two overarching priorities: work as a determinant of health and health as a determinant of work. The deadline for applications is Friday, December 14, 2018.

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Save the date: Dr. Paul Demers delivers IWH’s annual Nachemson lecture November 28

The Institute’s Alf Nachemson Memorial Lecture takes place this year on November 28. The lecture will be delivered by Dr. Paul Demers, director of the Occupational Cancer Research Centre (OCRC). In this role, Demers has been working with colleagues and collaborators across the country to develop and improve the surveillance of work-related cancers, establish their human and economic burden, and draw on research to develop policy recommendations aimed at preventing exposure. The event, to take place at the Design Exchange in downtown Toronto, is free and open to the public.

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IWH in the media: Can data help prevent workplace injuries and death?

Can big data—and its less complex sibling, routine data—help prevent injuries and death? Yes, say Institute for Work & Health (IWH)'s Dr. Chris McLeod and Dr. Cameron Mustard in a January 28, 2018, article in the Journal of Commerce. Routine data has been put to productive use in Ontario, where the Ministry of Labour learned that falls from heights (more than three metres) were the biggest cause of traumatic death in the construction industry, says Mustard, president of IWH.

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A Q&A on what we know—and don’t know—about marijuana and workplace safety

The federal government says it’s committed to legislation making recreational cannabis legal by July 1, 2018. As that date approaches, many workplace parties are concerned about the implications for occupational health and safety (OHS). So what does the research to date say about marijuana use and OHS? Find out in a Q&A with two of our researchers. (Hint: There’s a lot we need to learn.)

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IWH’s leading indicators helping Manitoba workplaces assess safety culture

The Institute for Work & Health (IWH)’s leading indicator tool—the popular Organizational Performance Metric (IWH-OPM)—has been adapted for use in Manitoba as part of a province-wide safety culture initiative. IWH Senior Scientist Dr. Ben Amick worked with SAFE Work Manitoba on many aspects of the initiative, including a definition of “safety culture” for the province, the development of a workplace-based safety culture assessment tool, and the development of frameworks for evaluating safety certification and safety culture in the province overall. The workplace-based tool, called the Safety Culture Assessment (SCA), is being offered to workplaces to help them understand and improve their safety culture. Moreover, it is also being incorporated into the province’s SAFE Work Certified program to assess whether safety certification helps improve a workplace’s safety and health management system in reducing the risk of injury and illness.

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IWH study examines effect of Ontario’s mandatory OHS training on awareness

A mandatory occupational health and safety (OHS) awareness training initiative in Ontario, introduced in July 2014, appeared to increase participation in training about health and safety rights and responsibilities. And workers who reported receiving the training were found to have higher levels of OHS awareness compared to workers who had not received training.

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Study by IWH scientist explores the link between COR certification and injury rates

The Certification of Recognition (COR) program recognizes and rewards employers that have robust occupational health and safety (OHS) and return-to-work policies. But do these employers actually have lower injury rates? That was the key question behind a study led by Dr. Chris McLeod of the Institute for Work & Health (IWH) and the University of British Columbia’s Partnership for Work, Health and Safety. The findings, reported on in the Spring 2016 issue of At Work, are also summed up in a new video card. Check it out and please share!