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Two workers at a window shutters manufacturing shop floor
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When do older workers with chronic conditions plan to retire?

Having a health condition or a chronic disease can be challenging for older workers, but it doesn’t necessarily decrease their intention to work or hasten their retirement. According to an IWH study on retirement expectations, with appropriate policies and practices, older workers with health limitations can be supported to remain active in the labour force.

A collage of portraits of diverse workers
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New website offers workplace information on accommodating and communicating about episodic disabilities

Accommodating and Communicating about Episodic Disabilities (ACED), a five-year partnership led by the Institute for Work & Health (IWH), is developing evidence-based workplace resources to support the sustained employment of people with chronic, intermittent and often-invisible disabilities (e.g. depression, arthritis, HIV/AIDs, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, multiple sclerosis and more). Today, IWH launched a website to share information about the ACED project, the partners involved, and the findings and tools as they become available.

Graphic of supervisor, with "supervisors matter" in text
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Supervisor’s response to work injury matters to return to work: Our latest video

Supervisors are busy. They’re always juggling multiple demands for their time and attention. But that moment when they learn a worker is injured, do they react with concern and empathy or blame and skepticism? As the latest research-based video from the Institute sums up, a supervisor’s response can make a difference to whether an injured worker returns to work successfully within a few months. It’s one of the ways supervisors matter.

Two grey-haired workers have a discussion
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What an aging workforce means for injury and RTW outcomes

As the average age of Canadian workers continues to rise, employers may wonder about the effects on work injury, recovery, return to work and remaining at work. Some may expect that risks of injury are higher among older workers, that their injuries are more severe, or that timelines to recover and return to work are longer. However, findings from recent studies, including several conducted at IWH, paint a more nuanced picture. We summarized the evidence in an article published this spring in the Ontario Occupational Health Nurses Association (OOHNA) Journal.

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When and how do financial incentives work to encourage the hiring of people with disabilities?

Wage subsidies and other financial supports are widely used by Canadian governments to encourage employers to hire people with disabilities. Yet, employers, disability advocates, service providers and people with disabilities hold strong and often polarized views about the merits of these incentives. What's more, the research on the effectiveness of these policy instruments is surprisingly scarce. That's why an IWH team, in a new research project, is setting out to produce guidelines and resources on best use of financial incentives.  

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5 things we think you should know about RTW

Ground your return-to-work programs and policies on evidence. Every April, the Institute for Work & Health (IWH) highlights five research findings from the previous year that we think can make a difference to workplace injury and disability prevention programs. We now unveil a new variation, "5 things we think you should know about RTW." It sums up five recommendations for improving your return-to-work and stay-at-work practices, based on recent research from IWH.  

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IWH associate scientist a recipient of Ottawa's New Frontiers in Research Fund

Congratulations to IWH Associate Scientist Dr. Arif Jetha, who has been awarded a grant from the Government of Canada's New Frontiers in Research Fund. The grant, announced this week, will support Jetha in a new research project examining the future of work and how the changing labour market may impact young people with disabilities.

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Now hiring: Strategic foresight specialist for a one-year project coordinator contract

The Institute is seeking a strategic foresight specialist for a project coordinator position. This person will work on a federally funded research project examining the future of work for young people with disabilities. The Canadian labour market is undergoing a substantial shift with the rise of automation and precarious work. What are the implications for young people with disabilities, who already face barriers accessing the labour market? 

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Arthritis advocacy organization develops resources with IWH research

For the three in five Canadians with arthritis who are of working age, a diagnosis can have considerable impact on work. The Canadian Arthritis Patient Alliance (CAPA), a Canada-wide, patient-driven grassroots organization, recently developed a set of resources for patients on managing the condition at work. To develop the resources, CAPA surveyed its members on employment needs and integrated research, including studies conducted by IWH. The Institute’s Dr Arif Jetha, especially, worked closely with CAPA to provide the evidence behind the messages. 

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News release: women experience more work disruptions due to eldercare

The burden of caring for an older relative falls more on women than on men, and it’s showing up in women's higher rates of work disruption. According to a new Institute for Work & Health study, women are more likely than men to stop working, to work part-time or to take time off work during the week due to eldercare. The open access study is published in the Journals of Gerontology.