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Comparing two silica dust prevention methods: a slidecast

Research suggests that 380,000 Canadians are exposed to silica dust at work and, each year, 200 new cases of lung cancer in Ontario can be attributed to silica dust exposure. In this IWH Speaker Series presentation, Dr. Emile Tompa looked at the costs and benefits of two types of silica dust prevention strategies: use of personal protective equipment or use of engineering controls (i.e. the wet method). His presentation is now available as a slidecast.  

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Should you mostly sit or stand at work? New IWH video has the answer

If you’re confused by seemingly duelling headlines about the negative health effects of prolonged sitting and prolonged standing, we’ve got a video for you. It just so happens that two of the scientists behind these headlines work at the Institute for Work & Health. We put them before the camera, side by side, to sort out the take-away message.

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Conference to continue work on national strategy on work and disability

Disability and Work in Canada 2018, taking place December 3-4, 2018 in Ottawa, will engage delegates in reviewing and building consensus around a proposed national strategy to improve the level of employment among people with disabilities in Canada. The conference is being hosted by the Disability and Work in Canada Steering Committee, which includes among its members a number of executive members of the Centre for Research on Work Disability Policy, a pan-Canadian, multidisciplinary research centre established in 2014 and headquartered at the Insitute for Work & Health.

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Institute accepting applications for post-doctoral Mustard fellowships in work and health

New researchers with an expertise in social, behavioural, organizational, clinical and/or population health sciences are invited to apply for a post-doctoral Mustard Fellowship in Work & Health. The Institute is looking for recent PhD graduates with an interest in doing research related to one of its two overarching priorities: work as a determinant of health and health as a determinant of work. The deadline for applications is Friday, December 14, 2018.

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At Work Fall 2018 is out

The Fall 2018 issue of At Work is now available. Inside this issue: promising strategies to reduce the misuse and abuse of prescription opioids, a round-up of the external grants awarded to Institute scientists, the Institute's role in the development of a toxic workplace screening tool, and more. If you didn't get your issue in your inbox, download the PDF here.

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Identifying promising strategies for preventing misuse and abuse of opioids

Since the start of the opioid crisis in the late 1990s, communities across North America have tried many different strategies to curb the misuse and abuse of prescription opioids. In an open-access systematic review, an IWH team analyzes the effectiveness of the studied strategies, identifies the most promising ones, and points out unintended consequences. 

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IWH Speaker Series—November 20: Clearing the haze on at-work cannabis use and perception

Recreational cannabis is now legal in Canada and many employers are concerned about the potential implications for workplaces. In this IWH Speaker Series presentation, Dr. Nancy Carnide shares early findings of a survey, conducted in June 2018, on patterns of cannabis use at work and workers' perceptions of such use. 

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SSHRC/CIHR partnership grant funds research into accommodating workers with chronic conditions

Health conditions such as depression, Crohn’s disease and HIV have at least one thing in common. People with these conditions can be in good health for long periods of time and then experience bouts of debilitating symptoms. These recurring and hard-to-predict episodes can make asking for, and providing, workplace accommodation a challenge. Now, Dr. Monique Gignac is leading research aimed at making conversations around accommodation easier, thanks to funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) and Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).

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Help us get this survey to young millennials with rheumatic disease

Despite advances in clinical care, millennial young adults with rheumatic disease continue to face challenges finding work and staying productive at work. Workplace policies can help overcome these challenges, but too often they’re aimed at older adults. An IWH study is currently under way to understand what supports millennials with rheumatic disease need from employers. This survey is a first step. Please help us get it into the hands of young workers with lupus, juvenile arthritis, scleroderma and other forms of rheumatic disease. Click on the survey or find out more about this project.

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Men and women with arthritis have same workplace support needs, but different levels of access

Do men and women with arthritis have different workplace accommodation needs? And do they differ in their access to workplace supports to meet these needs? A study published by IWH’s Dr. Monique Gignac recently examined these questions. It found unequal levels of access to support, which can be explained by the types of work that men and women do.