Job accommodation

Job accommodations, through modifications or adjustments to job processes, work environments and/or work schedules, are a key component of stay-at-work and return-to-work programs that are designed to ensure workers with work- or non-work-related injuries or illnesses (physical or mental) are able to sustain their employment. IWH conducts a wide range of research in this area, exploring barriers and facilitators to successful job accommodation, as well as disclosure of disability and other complex issues surrounding the accommodation of injured or ill workers. 

Featured

Two workers at a window shutters manufacturing shop floor
At Work article

Despite pain and fatigue, older workers with chronic conditions want to work to age 65

IWH study of retirement expectations finds boomers with health issues have same plans as healthy peers
Published: July 30, 2019
Colourful texts and images hand-drawn, under the title Co-creating a strategy for inclusive employment in Canada
At Work article

Seeking broad input on a pan-Canadian strategy to improve work choices for people with disabilities

Draft unveiled by cross-country coalition aims to spur voluntary action in four key areas
Published: January 13, 2019
Two workers at a window shutters manufacturing shop floor
At Work article

Despite pain and fatigue, older workers with chronic conditions want to work to age 65

Having a health condition or a chronic disease can be challenging for older workers, but it doesn't necessarily decrease their desire to work and retire at about the same age as healthy peers, finds an IWH study of retirement expectations.
Published: July 2019
The Conversation logo
IWH in the media

Employers miss out on talent by overlooking workers living with disabilities

One reason for the lower employment participation rates of people with disabilities is that employers often have prohibitive concerns and pessimistic ideas about hiring people with disabilities. But research conducted as part of the Canadian Disability Participation Project, by a team that includes IWH's Dr. Arif Jetha, suggests that many of the most common employer concerns about hiring people with disabilities are unfounded, writes project lead Dr. Silvia Bonnacio.
Published: The Conversation, July 2019
Vector diagram of three hands each holding a differently coloured puzzle piece
Tools and guides

Supporting return to work among employees with musculoskeletal or mental health conditions: an evidence-based practical resource

This resource synthesizes the research evidence on the practical solutions that workplaces can implement (in conjunction with workers' compensation, insurance and health-care authorities) to support the return to work of employees with musculoskeletal disorders or mental health conditions.
Published: May 2019
Journal article
Journal article
Journal article

Concerns about claiming, postclaim support, and return to work planning: the workplace's impact on return to work

Published: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, April 2019
Journal article
Journal article

Supporting the transition into employment: a study of Canadian young adults living with disabilities

Published: Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation, March 2019
Journal article
Journal article

Do health service use and return-to-work outcomes differ with GPs' injured-worker caseload?

Published: Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation, March 2019
Colourful texts and images hand-drawn, under the title Co-creating a strategy for inclusive employment in Canada
At Work article

Seeking broad input on a pan-Canadian strategy to improve work choices for people with disabilities

Public consultation is now under way on a draft strategy for building an inclusive workforce—one where people with and without disabilities have the same choices in their jobs and careers. Read about the draft strategy, unveiled last December at the Disability and Work in Canada 2018 conference.
Published: January 2019
Daily Commercial News logo
IWH in the media

Supervisors play key role in return from injury, study finds

A recently released report urges employers to ensure supervisors express immediate support when a worker is injured or becomes ill and that they then remain positive during the recovery period to best ensure successful return-to-work (RTW) outcomes, writes Don Wall in Daily Commercial News.
Published: Daily Commercial News, August 2018
An older woman works in a workshop
At Work article

Sex/gender analysis: Men and women with arthritis have same needs at work, but not the same supports

Study of workers with arthritis finds the need for workplace supports goes unmet more often among women, and that's due to the type of jobs and workplaces women are in.
Published: August 2018