Young and new workers

Workers who are in some way “new” to their work have been shown to be at greater risk of work injury. They may be new to the labour market (i.e. young workers), new to their jobs (e.g. because of short-term contract or temporary work, or job change or promotion), or new to the country (i.e. recent immigrants). IWH research tracks injury rates trends among this group, explores the factors behind the increased risk, and evaluates programs designed to protect these potentially vulnerable workers.

Featured

An illustration of young people helping each other climb out of a mountain crevice
At Work article

Nine trends that will likely shape future of work for groups of vulnerable workers

Climate change, artificial intelligence, robotics and automation. The world of work will look very different in the next two decades as a result of major system-wide changes. What might it hold for vulnerable workers?
Published: April 12, 2021
A woman works at a laundry service
At Work article

Precarity more likely for older, new workers with disabilities

An IWH study finds the risks of working in precarious jobs are the same for people with and without disabilities. But among people with disabilities, precarity is more likely when people are older or have less job tenure.
Published: March 3, 2021
A young worker at her computer workstation holds her shoulder and neck in pain
Research Highlights

Examining the link between job insecurity, work limitations and persistent symptoms among young adults with rheumatic disease

Young adults with rheumatic disease who reported high work activity limitations were also more likely to report persistent high levels of pain, fatigue and active rheumatic disease symptoms. Those who experienced job insecurity were more likely to report persistent pain and active disease symptoms. That's according to an IWH follow-up study conducted over 27 months.
Published: August 2022
Project report
Project report

Strategies to ensure young persons with disabilities are included in the future of work

Researchers at the Institute for Work & Health are looking for concrete ways to ensure youth and young adults with disabilities are included in the future of work. In the summer of 2021, a research team conducted an online survey with a wide range of people across Canada. This report summarizes six key areas in the future of work that survey participants indicated could both pose difficulties and offer opportunities to young people with disabilities. The report also presents the solutions that participants suggested to address the barriers and take advantage of the opportunities.
Published: May 2022
IWH Speaker Series
IWH Speaker Series

What the future of work looks like to young people with disabilities

What do young people with disabilities think about when they weigh their job options and consider their career goals? Given the massive changes expected in the world of work—changes brought on by the rise of automation, digital technologies, new forms of work, among others—what barriers and opportunities do young people with disabilities perceive on the horizon? In this presentation, IWH Scientist Dr. Arif Jetha shares findings from his interview-based study of young adults with disabilities. He also discusses what support they need to meet the challenges and take advantage of the potential opportunities of a changing labour market.
Published: December 2021
Project report
Project report

Fragmentation dans l'avenir du travail

D’ici deux décennies, le monde du travail au Canada et dans les autres pays industrialisés sera fort différent de ce qu’il est aujourd’hui. Une équipe de recherche basée à l’Institut de recherche sur le travail et la santé a entamé un projet qui vise à aider la préparation des jeunes personnes handicapées pour le monde du travail de l’avenir. Le rapport provenant de ce projet décrit neuf tendances susceptibles de modeler l’avenir du travail et leur incidence pour les travailleurs vulnérables.
Published: April 2021
An illustration of young people helping each other climb out of a mountain crevice
At Work article

Nine trends that will likely shape future of work for groups of vulnerable workers

Climate change, artificial intelligence, robotics and automation. The world of work will look very different in the next two decades as a result of major system-wide changes. What might it hold for vulnerable workers?
Published: April 2021
Project report
Project report

Fragmentation in the future of work

In 2020, an Institute for Work & Health research team, using a method from the field of strategic foresight called horizon scanning, began exploring what the future may hold for workers, especially those in vulnerable conditions. Its findings are included in this report, which identifies nine future trends that may have a particular impact on vulnerable workers—both positive and negative.
Published: April 2021
A woman works at a laundry service
At Work article

Precarity more likely for older, new workers with disabilities

An IWH study finds the risks of working in precarious jobs are the same for people with and without disabilities. But among people with disabilities, precarity is more likely when people are older or have less job tenure.
Published: March 2021